Newsletter April 2013

April 2013

I am feeling exceptionally lucky to be in the Pacific Northwest throughout a glorious spring season.  ‘Tis truly beautiful here!

2013 Easter 021 Thank you for your feedback on the face mapping information I’ve shared over the past several newsletters.  Beginning this month, we will begin taking a brief look at facial features and their associated meanings.  By ‘brief’ I mean I will give a flavour of meaning to the immense amount of information which is available within specific facial qualities and features.  As always, I welcome your questions and comments

Cheers,

Glenna

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In this issue –

1. Overview of features and their associated meaning.

2. What information can be ‘’read’ by facial qualities?

3. Glenna’s reading of the March 2013 Face of the Month (www.facingfacts.info)

4. FAQ’s

5. Face of the Month – April 2013

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1. Facial features and their associated meaning.

One method of face reading that is used by many practitioners (there are several books available describing this method in various degrees of detail) is the study of facial features and characteristics and what each tells us about the individual.  This is a vast field of information but I will spend the next several newsletters introducing and briefly describing various aspects.  Please don’t hesitate to email me if you want further information on any specifics mentioned in the newsletters.

2. What information can be ‘read’ by facial qualities?

Facial qualities are the generalised characteristics of a person’s face which reflect the way that individual handles their feelings.  This includes the ‘wear and tear’ patterns etched into their face by their repetitive emotional reaction (or lack of emotions) to life events.  This includes such things as the underlying emotional canvas (are you seeing the face of a person who is chronically angry, frightened or anxious, happy, disgusted, sad, surprised, content, disconnected, etc.) as well as the various contours and general appearance of the face.  Basically, the more comfortable and open the individual is with handling and expressing their emotions, the better the overall condition of their face will be.  The more contours, ridges, lines, and so forth that are visible in the face, one can surmise that there is an increased amount of internal emotional conflict or complexities with that individual.

(More details in What’s In A Face? – A Dictionary for Heart-Centered Face Reading by Michael J. Lincoln. This 280-page reference book, revised March 2007, is available via www.talkinghearts.net.)

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3. Glenna’s reading of the March 2013 Face of the Month (www.facingfacts.info)

quvenzhane-wallis-red-carpet

Here is an example of a face that is nearly symmetrical when comparing her left (private) and right (public) halves.  Even at this young age her eyes show signs of grief through her happy smile.  Intelligent, determined, creative, open and slightly wary.

Quvenzhané Wallis is a brilliant young actress, the youngest person (at 9 years of age) to be nominated for the Best Actress category of the Academy Awards.

For those studying personality programmes: ORD, Bootstrap, SLIM, AYM and a touch of PANG

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4. FAQ’s – “In the past several newsletters, you have been describing different sections of the face.  Why is it important to separate the sections instead of looking at the face as a whole?”

Glenna replies – Each section is rich with information about different aspects of the person’s view of themselves or their view on other people and the world around them.  Rarely when we look at a face do we actually ‘see’ and compare all aspects.  Some of us are captivated by a person’s eyes while others concentrate on the mouth or other sections of the face for our first impressions.  I invite you to try the following experiment . . . have someone cut a photograph into four quarters (vertically and horizontally through the exact middle).  Study one quarter section at a time, observing all you can in each section before studying the next quarter section (refer back to previous issues of the newsletter for more information on each section).  Then put the right half of the photo together with the mirror image and make notes on your observations before proceeding to repeat this with the left half of the face.  Once you’ve made your notes on that, study the bottom half of the face, and then the top half of the face.  Only after you have looked at each of the above sections individually do you then study the whole face.  After this process do you find you are able to ‘see’ and understand much more about the individual?  Let me know how you get on with this process.

5. Face of the Month – April 2013

April 2013

If this is your first visit to my monthly Newsletter – welcome.

This is the section of my newsletter where I invite experienced and first time ‘face readers’ to e-mail me their ‘reading’ of my ‘Face of the Month’.

I welcome everyone’s views and provide my interpretation as part of the following months newsletters.

Please ‘have a go’.

I look forward to your e-mails at  facingfacts@aol.com

Till next month. Enjoy this special season, wherever in the world you are at this moment.

All the best,

Glenna

www.facingfacts.info
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