Newsletter June 2013

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Recently I had the pleasure of participating in the National Emergency Nurses Affiliates conference in Vancouver. 

What an honor to be amongst hundreds of dedicated professionals working to save lives as well as improve quality of life within a variety of communities.

A patient who believes their medical professional knows, understands and accepts them has more confidence and motivation to heal so it is important to quickly establish good rapport.   There is no doubt that effective interviewing and accurate assessment of a patient’s personality and character are important and necessary skills.  Since perspective often determines what we ‘see’, learning to use face reading tools helps in the process of accurately anticipating, recognizing and addressing patients’ reaction to important information that one needs to share with them. 

 Additionally, in the process of learning and applying these tools, each of us learns to set healthier boundaries by becoming aware of the important difference between our ability to influence others and what we are actually responsible for.  This is a key point for each person working toward healthier work/life balance.

 Always, I enjoy receiving your questions and experiences with how you are using these face reading tools.

 All the best,

Glenna

 

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In this issue –

1. Overview of features and their associated meanings – face shapes.

2. Profile patterns as they relate to the three horizontal sections of the face.

3. Glenna’s reading of the May 2013 Face of the Month (www.facingfacts.info)

4. FAQ’s

5. Face of the Month – June 2013

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1. Facial features and their associated meaning – face shapes

Looking at the form created by the outline of the face and head, the overall shape of the face reflects the general temperament and lifestyle of the individual.  This is a manifestation of their broader emotional makeup and values.  To simplify this process, we would be observing and interpreting such characteristics described as ‘tall face’, short face’, ‘wide face’, ‘narrow face’, ‘oval face’, ‘square face’, ‘diamond shaped face’, ‘triangular face’, ‘rounded square face’ . . . and so forth.

There is a rich description of each of these (and much, much more!) in the What’s In A Face? A Dictionary for Heart-Centered Face Reading by Michael Lincoln (f.k.a.Narayan Singh).  This reference dictionary of facial features and their associated meaning has been recently revised and you (*) can now order it online from the website www.talkinghearts.net.

2. What about head positions?

Continuing with a brief overview of facial features and their associated meaning, we now move on to head positions.  From the way a person holds their head, we can make observations about how they react to (and interact with) their environment.   Have you ever wondered why some people often tilt their head one way or another while others may have their head thrust forward (‘lead with their head’), held back (‘lead with their feet’), or pulled down into their neck?  What subliminal ‘decisions’ or assumptions are you making about the person when you see these traits?

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3. Glenna’s reading of the May 2013 Face of the Month (www.facingfacts.info)

Stuart Hall court case

What you see in this face is congruent emotional expression in every section of his face.

Here is the face of a man who knows he has thoroughly disgraced himself, that he has destroyed the image and respect he had earned over a long and successful career with the BBC.

From a high point in his life, being bestowed an OBE by Queen Elizabeth just last year, to pleading guilty in court today of 14 counts of indecent assault against young girls (aged nine to seventeen).

Stuart Hall, 83, is probably going to prison.  This may well be a surprise to him since for so long he had gotten away with it unscathed.  Justice has been too long in coming for those he harmed.

For those studying personality programmes:   KEG, ORD, AYM

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4. FAQ’s – “If someone has had botox injections or cosmetic surgery – will that ‘fool’ or confuse the person reading their face?”

Glenna replies – Surgery or cosmetic procedures (as well as injuries or illnesses) can alter facial qualities or features and are important factors to consider during a ‘read’.  However, unless there have been major structural alterations, one can still gain deep insights into the individual’s basic personality programs, life experiences and belief systems by applying a variety of the face reading tools.

Obviously, there are many reasons one might have cosmetic surgery performed – reconstruction after a defacing injury or disease, lessen the impact or visibility of a birthmark, alter the proportions or size of facial features, reduce the signs of aging, and so forth.  When considering facial emotions tools – repetitive use of facial muscles in making expressions will soon create new lines and contours, so unless their underlying emotional fabric has changed, their face will crease into revealing their ‘old’ inner self.  Altering size and shape of facial features will impact the interpretation of their associated meaning when using that tool.  To a lesser degree, it may have some effect on the ‘reading’ of personality programmes – so again, it is worth taking into consideration whether cosmetic surgeries and procedures have been used by the individual you are ‘reading’.

You may also be interested in the book by Dr. Eric Finzi, The Face of Emotion, How Botox Affects Our Moods and Relationships.  He believes that botox can be used to treat depression on the premise that changing facial expressions changes moods – that by removing frown lines from a patient, others will respond and interact in a more positive way, thus creating a positive feedback loop.  This is an interesting concept that needs more research.

I’d love to hear your thoughts on this.

5.  Face of the Month – June 2013

June 2013 face

Welcome to my monthly challenge.

I invite you to look closely at the June Face of the Month.

You may wish to check your observations with my interpretation which will feature in the July 2013 Newsletter.  Alternatively, you may wish to e-mail me with your ideas and views – either way I always welcome e-mails and questions or observations.

If this is your first visit to my ‘Face of the Month’, or if you are a regular ‘Face Reader’ – good luck.

My e-mail is facingfacts@aol.com

All the best,

Glenna

http://www.facingfacts.info

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