Newsletter – April 2015

Spring Greetings from Seattle

2015 April Facing factsIn this beautiful part of the world our daylight hours are stretching out and spring blooms are abundant. How lucky we are to see such beauty in our world!

Reflecting on the process of ‘seeing’ and ‘experiencing’ the world around us I let my mind explore the difference between what the eyes focus on and how the brain interprets that into perception.

Herein lies a rich vein for research and thought, and an invitation to re-examine all we take for granted.

I am looking forward to seeing many of you at the National Emergency Nurses Association ‘Prepare for the Unexpected’ Conference in Edmonton in May.

Please email me any specific training questions you’d like to explore.

Keep in touch,

Glenna

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In this issue –

  1. Eye perspective … we see with our brain, not our eyes
  2. Eye wrinkles
  3. Glenna’s reading of the March 2015 Face of the Month (glennatrout.com)
  4. FAQ’s
  5. Face of the Month – April 2015

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  1. Eye perspective … we see with our brain, not our eyes

It only makes sense to think that when we look at something, the eye actually sends an image to the brain. Apparently, that is not the way it works at all. In a highly edited version of how we ‘see’, light reflected from objects enter the eye where it is focused and converted into electro-chemical signals. It is these signals that are delivered to various parts of the brain for interpretation and action.  We decipher or interpret our visual world based on pattern recognition, previous experiences and associations. Hence, much of what we see (or do not see!) often depends on what we actually expect to see. This is true whether we are referring to objects, people or perspective. It’s worth thinking about.

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  1. Eye wrinkle

Researchers at the University of Louvain in Belgium found that when crow’s feet were present in photographs of people smiling, those looking at the photos judged the smile to be more authentic, spontaneous, attractive and conveying more genuine amusement. People with these smile lines were also deemed to be more intelligent.

Remember that the emotions we feel and express repeatedly will become etched into our face as we age. All the more reason to keep smiling and enjoy life’s moments!

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  1. Glenna’s reading of the March 2015 Face of the Month (glennatrout.com)    college student

Since we mentioned ‘crows feet’ (the lines going up from the corner of the eyes) earlier in this newsletter, it’s worth noting the smile lines in these eyes.

They are somewhat less pronounced in his ‘social mask’ but still noticeable.

He also has the ‘rhetoric lines’ under both eyes (the lines that begin at the inner corner of the eye and sweep out and downward).

These indicate that he is skilled with the use of words and enjoys the way words are put together in lyrics to songs, poetry, story-telling or lively conversation.

For those studying personality programs those visible in just his eyes include Bootstrap and PANG.

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  1. FAQ’s – “How can you apply face reading? Why would I want to learn it? How would it help?”

Glenna replies –  Over the years I have applied face reading tools and skills in a variety of situations and for various purposes. Briefly, the knowledge gained in studying face reading improves the level of understanding and empathy we feel for self and others. Once we have a clearer perspective of why individuals (including our ‘self’) believe and act the way they do, we are able to choose a communication style that will have more meaning to that person. When we learn to identify the negative belief patterns an individual is holding, we can choose to be a catalyst and help build bridges toward positive change (if the other is open to growth).

This type of insight and broad knowledge base can then be applied to all aspects of our personal and professional life. Only you can decide if this is an area you would like to learn more about. Every bit of feedback I have received indicates that at the very least face reading tools provide a great deal to think about and brings compassion and new perspective through which to view self and others.

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5.  Face of the Month – April

April eyes

My April selection of a readers ‘eyes’ are courtesy of a volunteer from north of the 49th parallel and I invite you to e-mail your observations at any time during this month. My observations and interpretation will feature in the May edition of the Newsletter.  Good luck.

Every month I receive e-mails from a variety of countries around the world, so don’t be shy.

Until next month,

All best wishes,

Glenna

Email:   Glenna@glennatrout.com    Website: http://www.glennatrout.com

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