Newsletter – September 2015

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Happy September wishes to you!

As the rain happily falls outside I am busy preparing the newsletter for September, organizing a new series of Distant Learning, working on the individual ‘reads’ for each of you that volunteered to be a ‘face of the month’ and preparing for the three-day course scheduled to be held at South Health Campus on October 16-18 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

It will be wonderful to see you there if you can possible join us!  We will be featuring many interesting faces during the three-day training. Course details and registration available from Danielle – danilandry74@gmail.com or Pam – Pamela.Hurst@albertahealthservices.ca  

I thank all of you for your on-going interest in this subject and the unique tools I use and teach.

Keep in touch,

Glenna 

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In this issue –

  1. How important is eye contact during conversation with others?
  2. Seeing ourselves through the eyes of others
  3. Glenna’s reading of the August 2015 Eyes of the Month (www.glennatrout.com)
  4. FAQ’s
  5. Face (Eyes) of the Month – September 2015

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     1. How important is eye contact during conversation with others?

In every aspect of endeavouring to understand self and others better, awareness of and respect for cultural context and differences is important.  As a general social norm in Western cultures, looking others in the eyes – for an ‘appropriate’ amount of time – is a way of gaining connection, show interest, respect and being perceived to have such traits as being reliable, warm, confident and honest. If you overdo it, others may for the impression that you are intimidating, rude or power tripping.  Too little ‘eye-lining’ may well come across as ill-at-ease, insincere or even ‘shifty’. Geez … how do we get this one ‘just right’ especially considering that it would vary with such factors as circumstances, personalities, relationships and setting.   An article by Carol Kinsey Goman in Forbes magazine gives the general rule that ‘direct eye contact ranging from 30% to 60% of the time during conversation – more when you are listening, less when you are speaking – should make for a comfortable productive atmosphere.’  Let me know if (and how!) you manage to measure this for yourself or others.  Just be conscious that eye contact is important in building trust and communicating openness and interest in communication – especially when you are tempted to shift your eyes to your cell phone to see what text just came in.

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     2.  Seeing ourselves through the eyes of others –

According to researchers, it is normal for each of us to try to figure out how others see us.  This comes from the need to fit in socially.  However, our perceptions of how others view us are frequently inaccurate for a variety of reasons.  First we tend to view our self in more detail than others would.  We also tend to assume others see us in a way similar to how we see our self.  It is important to remember that each of us process and project information through our own unique system of ‘filters’ or self-concept and perceptions that have been introduced and shaped throughout our separate lives.  Using each of the face reading tools I teach can help us become aware, compassionate and understanding of self and others on many levels.

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     3.  Glenna’s reading of the August 2015 Eyes of the Month (www.glennatrout.com)

NENA_John (2)Discerning eyes was the most frequent comment I received from those of you who sent me you ‘read’ of the August face of the month.

So very accurate you are, too.  I would add generosity, wariness, grief and lovely humor … so many aspects of being alive in these eyes.

For those studying personality programs consider ORD, Bootstrap, PANG and KEG.

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      4.  FAQ’s – “Hi Glenna – I really enjoyed your introduction to face reading class and got a lot out of it. This is powerful information that can be used to make things better in so many ways. Please send me all your speakers notes and your PowerPoint so I can teach this class, too.”

Glenna replies  Seriously?  Wow … I am delighted that the very basics of face reading that we covered in class have resonated so deeply with you.  Additionally, I admire your absolute confidence and enthusiasm as well as your desire to share what you find useful and healing on various levels.

There is no doubt that being on this journey of learning, developing my skills and teaching in this area has been life-changing for me personally and professionally.  Throughout this process I have also learned that we can responsibly and genuinely share only what we have studied, processed and integrated at deeper levels, over a period of time.  I would be happy to work with you as you learn more of the tools, apply them at deeper levels and develop a program you’d like to share with others.

Thank you for your compliment and I wish you every success in all aspects of life.

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      5.  Eyes of the Month – September 2015

NENA_Sylvias_eyesMy thanks to each of you who shared your thoughts and impressions of the eyes featured in the August Newsletter ‘Eyes of the Month’.

I invite you to e-mail me with your insight into the eyes featured this month. As usual I look forward to your views, (and please include in your e-mail an indication of where you live in the world. Currently my website is visited from folks in over 60 countries). I will provide my interpretation in next month’s Newsletter – just ahead of the weekend training in Calgary, Canada.

Until next month, all best wishes,

Glenna

Email:  glenna@glennatrout.com Website:  glennatrout.com

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